To Burn a Prairie

  Samples Of Our Work
  Our Services,
        Philosophy
        and Prices
  Slide Shows and Events
  Plant Sales
  Art and Linda's in
        the News
  Educational Links
  Native Plants and
        Seed Sources
  Our Newsletters
  Conservation Foundation
        and Certification
  Monarch Butterfly Waysttions
  Contact Us
  Home


Prairie comes from a French word meaning "extensive meadow," a flat, treeless community of grasses and forbs (flowering plants).

Schulenberg Prairie

Because prairies grow in areas where long periods without rainfall are common, the plants have adapted by developing intricate, interwoven root systems that may extend nearly 20 feet below the surface.


Tall- grass prairies also adapted to periodic burning and now depend on fire for survival.

In the past, fires were started naturally by lightening striking dry grasses in the fall. The flat ground encouraged the fires to spread over wide distances, burning off shrubs and small trees, whose shade would otherwise slowly kill off sun-loving plants.

Historical accounts tell us that Native Americans set fire to prairies every year to keep them open and grassy, improving forage for bison and elk.

On Saturday, April 6, 2002 Ray Schulenberg and David Kropp burned their recently restored 3-acre prairie in Plainfield, IL.

Burn

Ken Benson & friends
Many people, including Ken Benson's horticulture class from Triton College, were there to help.

People from Du Page county and volunteer naturalists from various forest preserves also helped.

In the past, fires were started naturally by lightening striking dry grasses in the fall. The flat ground encouraged the fires to spread over wide distances, burning off shrubs and small trees, whose shade would otherwise slowly kill off sun-loving plants.

Historical accounts tell us that Native Americans set fire to prairies every year to keep them open and grassy, improving forage for bison and elk.

On Saturday, April 6, 2002 Ray Schulenberg and David Kropp burned their recently restored 3-acre prairie in Plainfield, IL.

Burn

Ken Benson & friends
Many people, including Ken Benson's horticulture class from Triton College, were there to help.

People from Du Page county and volunteer naturalists from various forest preserves also helped.

It was a proper, prescribed burn. The weather, temperature and humidity had to be "just so" and they were.

Burn 2

Burn 3
Burning the prairie restores its health and vigor by keeping out weeds and adding a fast shot of nutrients to the soil. A spring burn removes dead plant litter, allowing the sun to more easily warm the soil, encouraging new growth.

Burn 3
Art  

Art and Linda both participated.

Afterwards, there was fellowship and hospitality.

Linda


This site designed by:
lombard and Thomas Website Design